AB Electronics

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AB Electronics

Peter Hollenbeck
suggests using a 1-Wire DS2482-100 bridge from AB Electronics to connect to a DS18B20.

Does anyone know if this board is sold in Canada or the US?

Thanks,
Peter


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Re: AB Electronics

gilardh
Hi,
I buy 1-Wire DS2482-800 at this adress and it's works very well :
https://www.tindie.com/products/closedcube/ds2482-800-i2c-to-8-channel-1-wire-breakout-board/
It is manufactured and sent from the UK.
Maybe they can send it to you?
Regards
R
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Re: AB Electronics

Jan Kandziora
In reply to this post by Peter Hollenbeck
Am 13.06.2016 um 04:11 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
> This article:
> https://www.packtpub.com/books/content/raspberry-pi-and-1-wire
> suggests using a 1-Wire DS2482-100 bridge from AB Electronics to connect to
> a DS18B20.
>
This board is an overly complex design. The DS2483 onewire host chip
will work on a 3.3V I²C bus and gives you a 5V onewire at the same time.
External circuit: two resistors.

If you only want to connect a single DS18B20, the cheap&dirty solution
of connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient.

Kind regards

        Jan

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
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planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
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Re: AB Electronics

Andrew Elwell
> If you only want to connect a single DS18B20, the cheap&dirty solution
> of connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient.

This. However, if you want a bit more flexibility and plug n play
simplicity I've used the Sheepwalk electronics modules in the past
with good success, notably the
http://www.sheepwalkelectronics.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=30
- another i2c converter but has the advantage of just sticking it
ontop of a Pi.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
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Re: AB Electronics

CReese
In reply to this post by Jan Kandziora
I second the ds2483. Incredibly cheap and reliable.

> On Jun 13, 2016, at 2:43 AM, Jan Kandziora <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Am 13.06.2016 um 04:11 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
>> This article:
>> https://www.packtpub.com/books/content/raspberry-pi-and-1-wire
>> suggests using a 1-Wire DS2482-100 bridge from AB Electronics to connect to
>> a DS18B20.
> This board is an overly complex design. The DS2483 onewire host chip
> will work on a 3.3V I²C bus and gives you a 5V onewire at the same time.
> External circuit: two resistors.
>
> If you only want to connect a single DS18B20, the cheap&dirty solution
> of connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient.
>
> Kind regards
>
>    Jan
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
> patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
> consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
> J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
> planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
> _______________________________________________
> Owfs-developers mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/owfs-developers

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
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Re: AB Electronics

Peter Hollenbeck
In reply to this post by Jan Kandziora
Thanks for the very useful answers. I will order the Sheepwalk board but in the meantime will try the "cheap&dirty solution". To do so I need help. Let me put it in perspective. I'm a 79 year old former mainframe computer programmer but know next to zero electronics.

" ... connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient."

The waterproof DS18B20 has three leads:
    +5V (red)
    Ground (yellow)
    Data (blue)

Do I wire:
    GPIO pin 1 (3.3V) to red
    GPIO pin 6 (Gnd)  to yellow
    GPIO pin 7 (GPIO4) to blue
??

Thanks. You will be rewarded for helping an old geezer.
Peter
Stuart Island, B.C.


On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 2:43 AM, Jan Kandziora <[hidden email]> wrote:
Am 13.06.2016 um 04:11 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
> This article:
> https://www.packtpub.com/books/content/raspberry-pi-and-1-wire
> suggests using a 1-Wire DS2482-100 bridge from AB Electronics to connect to
> a DS18B20.
>
This board is an overly complex design. The DS2483 onewire host chip
will work on a 3.3V I²C bus and gives you a 5V onewire at the same time.
External circuit: two resistors.

If you only want to connect a single DS18B20, the cheap&dirty solution
of connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient.

Kind regards

        Jan

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
_______________________________________________
Owfs-developers mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/owfs-developers


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
_______________________________________________
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Re: AB Electronics

Peter Hollenbeck
Great.
I'll order a couple of DS2483 devices.

Thanks,
Peter

On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 9:58 AM, Peter Hollenbeck <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for the very useful answers. I will order the Sheepwalk board but in the meantime will try the "cheap&dirty solution". To do so I need help. Let me put it in perspective. I'm a 79 year old former mainframe computer programmer but know next to zero electronics.

" ... connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient."

The waterproof DS18B20 has three leads:
    +5V (red)
    Ground (yellow)
    Data (blue)

Do I wire:
    GPIO pin 1 (3.3V) to red
    GPIO pin 6 (Gnd)  to yellow
    GPIO pin 7 (GPIO4) to blue
??

Thanks. You will be rewarded for helping an old geezer.
Peter
Stuart Island, B.C.


On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 2:43 AM, Jan Kandziora <[hidden email]> wrote:
Am 13.06.2016 um 04:11 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
> This article:
> https://www.packtpub.com/books/content/raspberry-pi-and-1-wire
> suggests using a 1-Wire DS2482-100 bridge from AB Electronics to connect to
> a DS18B20.
>
This board is an overly complex design. The DS2483 onewire host chip
will work on a 3.3V I²C bus and gives you a 5V onewire at the same time.
External circuit: two resistors.

If you only want to connect a single DS18B20, the cheap&dirty solution
of connecting it (and a 1k pullup to 3.3V) to GPIO4 is sufficient.

Kind regards

        Jan

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
_______________________________________________
Owfs-developers mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/owfs-developers



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
_______________________________________________
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Re: AB Electronics

Jan Kandziora
In reply to this post by Peter Hollenbeck
Am 13.06.2016 um 18:58 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
>
> Do I wire:
>     GPIO pin 1 (3.3V) to red
>     GPIO pin 6 (Gnd)  to yellow
>     GPIO pin 7 (GPIO4) to blue
> ??
>
Correct. And please wire a 1k resistor between pin 1 and pin 7. That's
the needed pullup. Then, you have to load the w1-gpio kernel module.
It's already configured to use GPIO4.

Then you have two choices. Either use the w1_therm kernel module and
read the temperature from /sys/bus/w1/...
Or use the owfs toolset with the --w1 host adaptor option.

Kind regards

        Jan


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
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Re: AB Electronics

Peter Hollenbeck
I am trying the GPIO method, wired as suggested.
Have tried a waterproof DS18B20 and a DS18b20 IC.

I hoped to see a family 28 device but both devices give this:
pi@rpiD /weather $ sudo ls -l 1wire
total 0
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root  8 Jun 14 16:08 05.4AEC29CDBAAB
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root  8 Jun 14 16:08 10.67C6697351FF
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 alarm
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 bus.0
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 bus.1
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 settings
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root  8 Jun 14 16:08 simultaneous
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 statistics
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 32 Jun 14 15:21 structure
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 system
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root  8 Jun 14 15:21 uncached

Where are the 05 and 10 devices coming from?

Thanks,
Peter

P.S.
Is the best owfs documentation the man pages?
PH

On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 2:45 PM, Jan Kandziora <[hidden email]> wrote:
Am 13.06.2016 um 18:58 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
>
> Do I wire:
>     GPIO pin 1 (3.3V) to red
>     GPIO pin 6 (Gnd)  to yellow
>     GPIO pin 7 (GPIO4) to blue
> ??
>
Correct. And please wire a 1k resistor between pin 1 and pin 7. That's
the needed pullup. Then, you have to load the w1-gpio kernel module.
It's already configured to use GPIO4.

Then you have two choices. Either use the w1_therm kernel module and
read the temperature from /sys/bus/w1/...
Or use the owfs toolset with the --w1 host adaptor option.

Kind regards

        Jan


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
_______________________________________________
Owfs-developers mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/owfs-developers


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/305295220;132659582;e
_______________________________________________
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Re: AB Electronics

Jan Kandziora
Am 14.06.2016 um 18:13 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
> I am trying the GPIO method, wired as suggested.
> Have tried a waterproof DS18B20 and a DS18b20 IC.
>
What does

# ls -l /sys/bus/w1/devices

say?

> I hoped to see a family 28 device but both devices give this:
> pi@rpiD /weather $ sudo ls -l 1wire
>
Always list uncached to scan for new devices.


> Where are the 05 and 10 devices coming from?
>
05 is DS2405 and 10 is DS18S20.

You are sure your owfs config file doesn't specify "fake" but "w1" instead?

Kind regards

        Jan

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity planning
reports. http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/clk?id=1444514421&iu=/41014381
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Re: AB Electronics

Peter Hollenbeck
owfs.conf is the default from the install.
These are its non comment lines:
! server: server = localhost:4304
server: FAKE = DS18S20,DS2405
http: port = 2121
ftp: port = 2120
server: port = localhost:4304

I have finally made a DS18B20 IC work, wired just as suggested.
ls -l /sys/bus/w1/devices
total 0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Jun 15 16:55 28-000003be05d0 -> ../../../devices/w1_bus_master1/28-000003be05d0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Jun 15 16:54 w1_bus_master1 -> ../../../devices/w1_bus_master1

cat /sys/bus/w1/devices/w1_bus_master1/28-000003be05d0/w1_slave
gives (appropriately)
33 01 4b 46 7f ff 0d 10 08 : crc=08 YES
33 01 4b 46 7f ff 0d 10 08 t=19187

One waterproof DS18B20 does not work. (It may be my terrible soldering job on a proto board.)
ls -l /sys/bus/w1/devices
total 0
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Jun 15 16:43 w1_bus_master1 -> ../../../devices/w1_bus_master1

I have another waterproof DS18B20 that I'll try with clip leads, not with my crummy soldering.
Also have a DS1820 IC which I'll try.

Do you have suggestions for 1wire and owfs documentation. I know of their web sites and man owfs pages. Are there other sources? Any recommended books?

Thanks,
Peter

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity planning
reports. http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/clk?id=1444514421&iu=/41014381
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Re: AB Electronics

Jan Kandziora
Am 15.06.2016 um 19:02 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
>
> server: FAKE = DS18S20,DS2405
>
Well, yes, FAKE. Put

server: w1

in there instead.


>
> It may be my terrible soldering job on a proto board.
> I have another waterproof DS18B20 that I'll try with clip leads, not
> with my crummy soldering.
>
How to do beautiful electronics soldering:

* use a medium soldering iron (30-50W) with a small, round tip
* use Sn60Pb38Cu2 solder with 0,3-0,6mm diameter and flux core(!)
  Sn60Pb38Ag2 is fine too. Anything else is not practical for hobbyist
  purposes.
* use a wet sponge made of a cotton rag to clean the tip

All the above is crucial. If you ever want to solder more than two times
your life, use tips with iron (literally) plating above the copper. They
are totally worth it. In contrary, you don't need a fancy
thermo-regulated soldering iron.


Put the two parts you want to solder in place. Rest the tip at the
bigger lump of metal you want to heat. Usually, that is the wire, not
the board. Heat for two seconds. Put the tip to the other metal part for
a second at max. Now take away the soldering iron and push in the solder
wire *instead of the tip* for a second. Perfect soldering job.


>
> Do you have suggestions for 1wire and owfs documentation. I know of their
> web sites and man owfs pages. Are there other sources? Any recommended
> books?
>
The owfs website is the main source of documentation for owfs. For
onewire, I recommend to read the individual chips' datasheets. And then
there is "The Book of iButton Standards"

https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/app-notes/index.mvp/id/937

and various other application notes on onewire from Dallas/Maxim.

Kind regards

        Jan

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity planning
reports. http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/clk?id=1444514421&iu=/41014381
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Re: AB Electronics

Peter Hollenbeck
Thanks for all your input.
Good soldering tips.

Peter

On Wed, Jun 15, 2016 at 11:15 PM, Jan Kandziora <[hidden email]> wrote:
Am 15.06.2016 um 19:02 schrieb Peter Hollenbeck:
>
> server: FAKE = DS18S20,DS2405
>
Well, yes, FAKE. Put

server: w1

in there instead.


>
> It may be my terrible soldering job on a proto board.
> I have another waterproof DS18B20 that I'll try with clip leads, not
> with my crummy soldering.
>
How to do beautiful electronics soldering:

* use a medium soldering iron (30-50W) with a small, round tip
* use Sn60Pb38Cu2 solder with 0,3-0,6mm diameter and flux core(!)
  Sn60Pb38Ag2 is fine too. Anything else is not practical for hobbyist
  purposes.
* use a wet sponge made of a cotton rag to clean the tip

All the above is crucial. If you ever want to solder more than two times
your life, use tips with iron (literally) plating above the copper. They
are totally worth it. In contrary, you don't need a fancy
thermo-regulated soldering iron.


Put the two parts you want to solder in place. Rest the tip at the
bigger lump of metal you want to heat. Usually, that is the wire, not
the board. Heat for two seconds. Put the tip to the other metal part for
a second at max. Now take away the soldering iron and push in the solder
wire *instead of the tip* for a second. Perfect soldering job.


>
> Do you have suggestions for 1wire and owfs documentation. I know of their
> web sites and man owfs pages. Are there other sources? Any recommended
> books?
>
The owfs website is the main source of documentation for owfs. For
onewire, I recommend to read the individual chips' datasheets. And then
there is "The Book of iButton Standards"

https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/app-notes/index.mvp/id/937

and various other application notes on onewire from Dallas/Maxim.

Kind regards

        Jan

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity planning
reports. http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/clk?id=1444514421&iu=/41014381
_______________________________________________
Owfs-developers mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/owfs-developers


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity planning
reports. http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/clk?id=1444514421&iu=/41014381
_______________________________________________
Owfs-developers mailing list
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